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The .44 Remington Magnum, more commonly known as a .44 Magnum (Or .44 Mag) is simply a “large-bore cartridge” which was designed for a revolver.

Anytime I hear someone mention a “Magnum,” I know that they are referring to a revolver, which means they are also talking about a gun that packs a serious punch! However, I don’t know too much more about the .44 Mag or its bullets. Do you?

Here is an insight from NRA’s American Hunter:

We all owe Elmer Keith a debt of gratitude; he saw the need for several improvements in the cartridges of his day, and went at it like a charging rhino to see them brought to fruition. The .357 Mag. was his brainchild, as was the .41 Mag.; the .334 OKH (O’Neill-Hopkins-Keith) cartridge had a direct and irrefutable influence on the development of the .338 Win. Mag.

But among his works, the .44 Rem. Mag. ranks among the finest. Keith had a penchant for handguns that improved upon the existing cartridges and their performance. The .44 Spl.—introduced in the early 20th century and still a very useful cartridge—was the basis for the development, as Keith began experimenting with higher pressure loads. Keith chose the .44 Spl. for his platform for the choice of bullets, and the fact that the .44 revolver’s cylinder was of the same dimension of the .45 Colt, thereby offering increased strength. Keith’s higher pressure loads were enough to have Smith & Wesson and Remington get behind it, releasing the Model 29 revolver in the mid-1950’s, fueled by ammunition produced by Remington. The Ruger Blackhawk single-action followed quickly, and the handgun world was set on its ear.‘Dirty’ Harry Callahan, played by Clint Eastwood, made that Model 29 famous, relating the fact that it was (at the time) “the most powerful handgun on earth.” And powerful it is; though it may have been eclipsed by the .454 Casull, .460 S&W and .500 S&W, the .44 Rem. Mag. may represent the recoil limit for the average shooter. As far as its power level, the .44 Rem. Mag., when paired with a good bullet, is enough to hunt virtually all of North America’s game, at sensible handgun ranges.

The .44 Mag. shares the same rim dimension as its father, the .44 Spl, at 0.514”, but uses a longer case, at 1.285”. The longer case dimension is not necessarily for additional powder capacity, but to prevent .44 Rem. Mag. ammunition from being shot from a revolver chambered for .44 Spl. only. One of Keith’s best concepts—which is also applicable to the .357 Mag.—is that the improved….

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