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Memorial Day weekend calls for celebration and memorial of our fallen soldiers. The men and women who fought so hard and gave the greatest gift of all, their life.

So in preparation of Monday, here are 20 of the best war movies (of all time) to watch, as reported by our friends over at Bearing Arms.

 

In no particular order, they are as follows:

  1. The Hurt Locker

    Between this film and director Kathryn Bigelow’s follow-up, Zero Dark Thirty, we have the two finest modern-day studies of what it means to fight in today’s confusing war against terrorism. The slightest edge goes to The Hurt Locker, which dives deeply into the process of Iraq-based bomb defusing and the personal detachment that can result from putting oneself in harm’s way on an hourly basis.

  2. Black Hawk Down

    The film takes place in 1993 when the U.S. sent special forces into Somalia to destabilize the government and bring food and humanitarian aid to the starving population. Using Black Hawk helicopters to lower the soldiers onto the ground, an unexpected attack by Somalian forces brings two of the helicopters down immediately. From there, the U.S. soldiers must struggle to regain their balance while enduring heavy gunfire.

  3. American Sniper

    A slow-building and unlikely blockbuster (the biggest film of 86-year-old director Clint Eastwood’s career), this electrifying PTSD war drama became a political football for its questionable handling of the real-life Chris Kyle. But between a nervy performance by Bradley Cooper and some daring ambiguities on the matter of valor, you have a movie that only Eastwood, no simple conservative, could make.

  4. Patton

    Famously, this was Richard Nixon’s favorite film, a potent counterbalance to the voices of the protesters and a manly pep talk of righteousness. (It wasn’t enough to help the President with his problems.) George C. Scott is magnificent in the title role, railing iconically against “Hun bastards” in his opening monologue before a huge American flag.

  5. The Steel Helmet

    Ex-GI Samuel Fuller brings his rough-and-rugged perspective to this Korean War classic. A ragtag group of soldiers takes refuge from snipers in a Buddhist temple. The longer this respite lasts, the greater the racial and ideological tensions grow. The writer-director’s tabloid-headline style gives the proceedings a charged immediacy that lands with a gut punch.

  6. Bridge Over River Kwai

    Hark! Is that the “Colonel Bogey March” we hear? In David Lean’s rousing WWII epic, American POW William Holden plots a daring escape from a remote Japanese prison, while captured British colonel Alec Guinness and camp commandant Sessue Hayakawa determinedly vie for power. The title bridge figures in one of the most suspenseful action sequences ever filmed.

  7. The Dirty Dozen

    It’s become one of the most beloved “dad movies” of all time—but maybe Father knows best. The murderous “dozen,” conscripted for a suicide mission on the eve of D-Day, includes a shifty-eyed psychopath (John Cassavetes), a religious fanatic and woman-beater (Telly Savalas), and a slow-witted “General” (Donald Sutherland). They get the job done.

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