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If you were anywhere near Twitter or Facebook this week, we imagine you may have encountered more than a few pretentious animal “activists” spewing their delusional drivel all over the web.

These young, malnourished millennials were in a tizzy, triggered, if you will, over yet another decision by the Trump administration that they didn’t agree with.  Of course, it’s not hard to find such disparities between these two combatants – the young and mindless are prone to despise literally anything Donald Trump does.

Look around an office park at feeding time – you’ll find no millennials wearing red ties; not since Hillary Clinton lambasted the “red power tie” in an interview.

But today, the angst of these fine young folk was directed deep into the heart of Africa, where an inexcusable percentage of children are suffering from starvation.  Our ever-ballooning American youths were upset because the government decided to begin allowing some trophy Elephant souvenirs to be imported into America on a case by case basis.

The millennial mob was angry because elephants are cute, or some such emotional nonsense.  It’s not because the animals were endangered.  In fact, these elephant hunts often take place within populations that are well monitored and maintained.

Let Outside Magazine explain:

“There are two major factors contributing to shrinking elephant populations: poaching and habitat loss. It’s estimated that the illegal trade in ivory could be worth as much as $1 billion a year, and that up to 23,000 elephants are being poached each year. That’s dramatic and dangerous, but the biggest threat elephants and other large animals face is from ever-expanding human civilization, and the towns, roads, and agriculture that eat away at their habitat. People who rely on farming and cattle ranching value the land and the crops that grow on it. Which means that the elephants that graze on that land are a threat to business.

“Sport hunting, counterintuitively, can counteract both habitat loss and poaching by giving the elephants a legitimate monetary value. Elephant hunts cost tens of thousands of dollars; that profit turns the animals from a nuisance into a valuable commodity. If a land owner stands to profit more from elephant hunts than he does from cattle farming, he’ll allow more elephants to remain wild, and he also has the incentive to protect the animals from poaching. Many of the owners of land where elephants are hunted hire armed security teams to protect the animals from poachers. “

Not only that, but these hunts bring enormous revenue into the often impoverished regions in which they occur.

“Hunting excursions in Zimbabwe can cost more than $37,000 and hunters also have to pay up to $14,500 for each elephant killed, according to safari hunting websites. A portion of the cost of a hunting trip led by guides includes goes to that country’s government to be used for conservation. The ivory from an elephant’s tusks is estimated to be worth $21,000 but it is still illegal to import ivory into the U.S. from any country.”

If those late night, heart wrenching television commercials are accurate, then the revenue from one elephant hunt could feed a child, at a dollar a day, for decades.

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