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Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul (R) asked a simple question to FBI Director Christopher Wray.

Are President Trump’s phone conversations recorded by the FBI?

Wray’s response?

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From The Daily Wire:

On Wednesday, Federal Bureau of Investigation Director Chris Wray declined to answer a question from Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) about the possibility that President Trump might be under surveillance.

Questioning Wray before the Senate Homeland Security Committee, Paul asked: “Do you think that it’s possible that the president’s conversations with international leaders are in the [Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act] database?”

Wray replied, “I’m not sure there’s anything I could speak to in this setting.”

Continued:

Paul responded, citing a Washington Post report that claimed there were 1,500 times then-President Obama was minimized. “Do you think it’s possible that Congress — that members of Congress are in the FISA database if we talk to international leaders?” Paul asked.

Again, Wray avoided answering the question. “Well, Senator, I am quite confident that we are conducting ourselves in a manner consistent with the law and the Constitution that’s subject to extensive oversight,” he said. “I don’t know that I can speak to every hypothetical about whether there have been [such] situations.”

WATCH:

It is being learned that the FBI and DOJ redacted key intelligence documents that implicate Hillary Clinton and the Democrat National Committee, and have nothing to do with national security.

From The Hill:

To declassify or not to declassify? That is the question, when it comes to the FBI’s original evidence in the Russia collusion case.

The Department of Justice (DOJ) and the FBI have tried to thwart President Trump on releasing the evidence, suggesting it will harm national security, make allies less willing to cooperate, or even leave him vulnerable to accusations that he is trying to obstruct the end of the Russia probe.

Before you judge the DOJ’s and FBI’s arguments — which are similar to those offered to stop the release of information in other major episodes of American history, from the Bay of Pigs to 9/11 — consider Footnote 43 on Page 57 of Chapter 3 of the House Intelligence Committee’s report earlier this year on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

Continued:

Until this past week, the footnote really had garnered no public intrigue, in part because the U.S. intelligence community blacked out the vast majority of its verbiage in the name of national security before the report was made public.

From the heavy redactions, all one could tell is that FBI general counsel James Baker met with an unnamed person who provided some information in September 2016 about Russia, email hacking and a possible link to the Trump campaign.

Not a reporter or policymaker would have batted an eyelash over such a revelation.

 

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