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In the world of firearms, a massive seismic shift has been rumbling for years, as women are quickly becoming one of the fastest growing demographics in the industry.

This has been spawned, in large part, by the NRA’s efforts and outreach and the consistent message that the organization has been able to disseminate:  Guns are not a threat on their own.

In fact, the “gun life” has become far more mainstream in recent years, with ranges popping up in locales that normally wouldn’t support such a business due to this normalization of firearm ownership during America’s conservative awakening.

Also, as the world becomes smaller and smaller thanks to the internet, a clearer picture of the gun ownership, target shooting, and hunting is being portrayed in the free media, allowing men and women to come to their own conclusions regarding firearms.  No longer are they simply stuck with whatever take the mainstream “news” decides to give them.

This has led to an enormous boom in the female firearms segment of the industry, and, particularly in hunting.  Women are quickly learning the joy of the ancient tradition, and, in some cases, these ladies have parlayed their interest into lucrative careers via social media.

Because of this boom, a number of manufacturers have jumped on board to create women-specific apparel and gear for the intrepid huntresses of the world.  This had led to a whole lot of pink guns on the market, as well as a push to make blaze pink a legal safety color out in the bush.

As it turns out, women aren’t all that interested in being placated to in such a degree, and are turning away from the loud hue.

“In late 2017, retailers in Wisconsin reported that its stock of blaze pink apparel moved off shelves at a much slower pace than blaze orange.

“’We haven’t had a huge response to it,’ Nate Scherper, Vice President of Sherper’s told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. ‘We’ve really had very few people looking to buy it.’ He added, ‘Most of our female customers prefer the orange over the pink.’

“The industry as a whole has worked to incorporate and encourage women to take up the shooting sports, but some say the focus on frilly colors might actually have the opposite effect.

“’I think it’s really misguided,’ Sarah Ingle, president of the Women’s Hunting and Sporting Association, told the publication. ‘Among the group of women I hunt with, we find it insulting and demeaning.’”

One place in which the blaze pink is succeeding, however, has been with young women who are being encouraged by the adults in their lives to explore hunting as a hobby from a young age.

As it turns out, however, the big girls are gunning for the big boys in our modern world, and are making an enormous impact on hunting and gun sports in America while they’re at it.

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