Please disable your Ad Blocker to better interact with this website.

Order KEEP AND BEAR: THE MOVIE now for FREE shipping and a FREE bumper sticker!
Store

According to national estimates, between 15 and 20 percent of all pregnancies in the United States result in miscarriages, also known as a “spontaneous abortion”,  every year.

Many different things can cause a miscarriage, and they happen much more often than people would think. Some of the causes could be:

 

  • Drug and alcohol abuse
  • Exposure to environmental toxins
  • Infection
  • Overweight
  • Physical problems with the mother’s reproductive organs
  • Smoking
take our poll - story continues below

Who should replace Nikki Haley as our ambassador to the U.N.?

  • Who should replace Nikki Haley as our ambassador to the U.N.?  

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Completing this poll grants you access to Keep and Bear updates free of charge. You may opt out at anytime. You also agree to this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Trending: WATCH: Warren Blatantly Lies About Parents Eloping Because Mom Was Indian

 

Florida has announced themselves as the first state to begin issuing birth certificates for miscarriages, which will also double as a death certificate in a way, as it does not insinuate that the baby was born alive.

Gov. Rick Scott signed the bill on Wednesday, which essentially gives the mothers a “certificate of nonviable birth.” It is expected to go into effect on July 1.

Fox News reports:

Under the Grieving Families Act, the state will issue the certificates only if parents request them.

It would be available to women whose pregnancies end after nine weeks and before 20 weeks of gestation.

Pregnancies that end at 20 weeks or later are considered stillbirths, and death certificates must be issued. Parents can also request a birth certificate in such cases.

Parents would be able to name the lost fetus on the certificate.

The certificates will contain language that they’re not to be used as proof of a live birth.

This at least gives women something to have as proof of their child’s existence, even if the baby did not make it.  Do you think every state should do this?

 

Join the conversation!

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, profanity, vulgarity, doxing, or discourteous behavior. If a comment is spam, instead of replying to it please hover over that comment, click the ∨ icon, and mark it as spam. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain fruitful conversation.

Become an Insider!

Enter your email address below to stay in the loop and read our latest and greatest updates!

Send this to a friend