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Musician Paul McCartney has made it very clear over the years that he is anti-gun.

This would imply he doesn’t want guns around his person at any time whatsoever.

However, during a recent concert at New York City’s Grand Central Station, The Beatles legend had security armed with full-on machine guns.

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Seems a tad hypocritical.

From Gateway Pundit:

NPR reporter Andrew Flanagan opened his report on the show with a description of a heavily armed soldier protecting McCartney.

“Walking through the warm, vanilla hallway of Grand Central Station, I tried to enter a barricade when an army sentry — helmet, muted green-and-sand uniform, a pistol and a big machine gun — said it was the wrong entrance. “This is for the artist — go down, take a left and stick to the wall.”

Here’s a photo of soldiers with machine guns:

Follwing the murder of bandmate John Lennon in 1980, McCartney noted how terrified he was to see soldiers with machine guns, per Durham Region:

He recalled to Uncut magazine: “It was weird because in the days that followed it, I was sitting in the house. We had a little perimeter fence, mainly to keep foxes out, because we had some chickens.

“I’m aware of security threats, so I’m on high alert and I look out and I see someone with a f***ing gun, like a machine gun, an assault rifle – ‘Wha?!’ He’s in full military gear, and then I see there’s a whole patrol of them. I’m going, ‘Holy s**t, what’s going on?’.”

[…]

He added: “I don’t know what I did. I think I rang the police. It turned out to be army manoeuvres. [They said] ‘Oh, sorry. Are these your woods?’ I’d put two and two together and made a thousand. God, I don’t know how I lived through it. You think you’d just faint dead on the ground. But they were all there, coming through these woods.”

McCartney attened the March for Our Lives event in Washington DC earlier this year.

From USA Today:

Paul McCartney is marching for a special reason: John Lennon.

The former Beatle told CNN Saturday that he is participating in the New York March for Our Lives rally to honor his late, former bandmate.

“One of my best friends was killed in gun violence right around here,” McCartney told the news station. “So it’s important to me.”

Here’s more on the Grand Central Station concert:

Walking through the warm, vanilla hallway of Grand Central Station, I tried to enter a barricade when an army sentry — helmet, muted green-and-sand uniform, a pistol and a big machine gun — said it was the wrong entrance. “This is for the artist — go down, take a left and stick to the wall.”

Around the corner to the right, a small island’s worth of people stood smiling, pushed up against a barricade with their phones out, asking if it was true. The person up ahead had gotten a wristband randomly on the street, he told them, causing a ripple of jealousy across the eyes of those in earshot. As we waited, a light static of amplified sound buzzed out from behind a curtain, bouncing around the marble walls and ceilings and floors, losing its warmth with each refraction. Someone put my phone into a pouch and locked it, and handed me a plastic candle. “When you hear the melody of ‘Hey Jude,’ turn this on.”

And there was Paul McCartney, standing on a low stage under the high ceilings of Vanderbilt Hall, a sort of vestigial space of the station that used to function as a waiting room and now is available to rent for weddings or concerts by living legends at a cost that begins at a reported $25,000 a night. Also there: a full regiment of technical engineers, camera operators (for the live stream, viewable below) and sound experts, including Giles Martin, the son of Beatles producer George, behind the board.

 

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